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Videos

Qaqamiiĝux Film Series

This film series explores how to harvest and prepare traditional foods from the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands.

 

 Field guide to come…

Field guide to come…

Seine Fishing at Camp Qungaayux̂

APIA is excited to release the first video in our film series, based on the book by the same name, Qaqamiiĝux̂. This series will explore how to harvest and prepare traditional foods from the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands. For the first episode, take a close-up look at seine fishing as practiced by staff and campers at the Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska’s Camp Qungaayux̂

Alugax̂ / Saranax̂  (The Chocolate Lily): How to Harvest, Prepare, & Preserve

The chocolate lily is a plant that grows naturally in the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands region. It not only boasts a beautiful bloom, but the bulbs are harvested and eaten as part of the Unangax̂ traditional diet. Follow along with Sally Swetzof as she shows us how to harvest, prepare and preserve this traditional food in APIA’s second video in the Qaqamiiĝux̂ video series.

 

Field guide to come…

Field guide to come…

How to Butcher Itx̂aygix̂

Itx̂aygix̂, or reindeer, has been hunted and eaten in the Aleutian and Pribilof Region as part of the Unangax̂ diet for decades. Follow along with Sally Swetzof, from Atka, as she shows us how to butcher this local food in APIA’s third video in the Qaqamiiĝux̂ video series

How to Prepare Boiled Fish Heads

An important value for the Unangax̂ people is to make use of every part of each plant or animal harvested. Follow along with Karen and Liam from Sand Point as they guide us through a boiled salmon head recipe in APIA’s fourth video in the Qaqamiiĝux̂ video series.



Field guide to come…

Field guide to come…

How to Cook Octopus

Octopus is commonly hunted and eaten in the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands Region and prepared a variety of ways including, but not limited to, octopus patties, fried octopus, and marinated octopus.  This week, follow along with Anne in Sand Point as she shows us a few different ways to prepare octopus in APIA’s fifth video in the Qaqamiiĝux̂ video series.

How to Butcher Kasamix̂ (Common Eider Duck)

Kasamix̂, or the common eider duck, is often hunted and eaten during the summer months in the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands and can be prepared in a variety of ways. Follow along with Sally in Atka as she shows us how to butcher a kasamix̂ in APIA’s sixth video in the Qaqamiiĝux̂ video series.”



Field guide to come…

Field guide to come…

How to Make Salve from Traditional Unangax̂ Plants

Chikayaasix̂ (fireweed), chuhnusix̂ (wild geranium), and saahmikaadax̂ (yarrow) are three plants that can be harvested in the Aleutian and Pribilof regions, and have many different uses. Follow along with Dr. Gary Ferguson as he shows us how to create a medicinal salve from these plants in the seventh video in the Qaqamiiĝux̂ video series.

Hunting Qawax̂ (Sea Lion) in Unalaska & Atka

In Unangax̂ culture, sea mammals are highly respected animals. Historically, nearly every part of the animal was eaten or purposefully used. Follow along with Moses and Larry ​Dirks in Unalaska, and Danny ​Snigaroff in Atka as they share their knowledge and experience hunting qawax̂ (sea lion) in the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands.



Field guide to come…

Field guide to come…

How to Harvest Slukam Saamlangin (Seagull Eggs) in Akutan

Slukam saamlangin, or seagull eggs, are gathered and eaten during the spring and summer months in the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands and can be prepared in a variety of ways. Follow along with Jacob Stepetin and Josephine Shangin in Akutan as they show us how to harvest slukam saamlangin.

Harvesting Bidarki in Atka and Sand Point

In Unangax̂ culture, there is a saying: “When the tide is low, the table is set!”  In this film, we head to the rocky beaches of Sand Point and Atka and comb for edible chitons, called “bidarki.” Follow along with Anne Morris and Karen Kalmakoff, in Sand Point, in APIA’s next video in the Qaqamiiĝux̂ series.


Nutritional Facts about Traditional Unangax̂ Foods

This fun animated film series introduces nutrition fact labels by highlighting important nutrients found in traditional foods. The films also explain how those nutrients keep our bodies healthy.

 

Nutritional Facts about Salmon

In Unangax̂ culture, salmon are highly respected and is an important traditional food. Salmon also happens to be very healthy to eat! Follow along with Ansley Carlough as she uses a nutrition fact label to point out how nutrients found in different types of salmon like protein, healthy fats and vitamin D, keep our bodies healthy.

Nutritional Facts about Berries

In Unangax̂ culture, berries are an important traditional food. Berries also happen to be very healthy to eat! Follow along with Ansley Carlough as she uses a nutrition fact label to point out how nutrients found in different types of berries, like fiber and vitamin C, keep our bodies healthy.

 

Nutritional Facts about Caribou/Reindeer

Reindeer and caribou are important food source​s in Unangax̂ culture. They also happen to be a healthy to eat! Follow along with Charlotte Rutherford as she uses a nutrition fact label to point out how nutrients found in reindeer and caribou, like protein and vitamin A, keep our bodies healthy.

Nutritional Facts about Seal/Sea Lion

In Unangax̂ culture, seal and sea lion are highly respected and important traditional food​s. Seal and sea lion meat and oil also happen to be very healthy to eat! Follow along with Charlotte Rutherford as she uses a nutrition fact label to point out how nutrients found in seal and sea lion, like healthy fats and iron, keep our bodies healthy


Traditional Foods Digital Stories

To view digital stories on traditional foods, click below or here.

 

 


Alaska Native Diet Film Series

The Traditional Foods Program has developed a video series entitled: Alaska Native Diet. There are three films in the series. These films were produced under a grant from the National Institute of Health and were filmed mostly in Atka and St. Paul as part of a greater research project. This series was completed in 2005 by the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands Association.

Film 1: Introduction of Dietary Benefits and Risks in Alaskan Villages.
Film 2: The Importance of Traditional Foods.
Film 3: Monitoring Contaminants in Rural Alaska (English/Russian).

To view these films, click below or here

 

 

 

The Traditional Foods Program has also developed a video series entitled: Alaska Native Diet: Assessing the Benefits and Risks of Diet in Rural Alaska. In this film series, 11 Alaska experts were interviewed and recorded to discuss topics related to benefits and risks of diet in rural Alaska. This series was produced in 2007 by the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands Association. The topics of the interviews include:

Nutritional Benefits of Traditional Foods- Dr. Elizabeth Nobmann
Traditional Foods and the Prevention of Dietary Related Diseases- Dr. Gary Ferguson
Contaminants in Foods- Carl Hild
Community-Based Research- Patricia Cochran, Vi Waghiyi, Pamela Miller, Larry Merculieff
Human Biomonitoring- Dr. James Berner
Dietary Survey- Dr. Elizabeth Nobmann
Sampling- Dr. Todd O’Hara, Donna Willoya, Pamela Miller, Vi Waghiyi, Sara Moses
Selecting a Lab- Dr. Bob Gerlach, Dr. Lori Verbrugge, Dr. Todd O’Hara, Sara Moses, Patricia Cochran
Interpretation of Data- Dr. Lori Verbrugge
Assessing Benefits and Risks- Larry Merculieff
Partners in Food Safety- Patricia Cochran, Dr. Bob Gerlach, Carl Hild, Donna Willoya, Dr. James Berner, Dr. Gary Ferguson, Larry Merculieff, Pamela Miller, Vi Waghiyi, Dr. Elizabeth Nobmann, Sara Moses, Dr. Todd O’Hara, Dr. Lori Verbrugge ux̂